Archive for the Nathaniel Hawthorn Category

Salem Historical Society

Posted in Maritime history, Nathaniel Hawthorn, Salem MA, Witch Hysteria (1692) on June 30, 2020 by tommcge

Dear Fellow Historians:

Maritime history, a Literary past and of course Witchcraft!

Salem, MA has a wealth of history! We all are conscious of what transpired within this tiny community in 1692. But, this town has so much more at its disposal than witches. An influential maritime seaport, Salem challenged  its neighbor Boston as a shipping harbor. Gentlemen such as Richard Crowninshield Sr, Joseph White, Elias Hasket Derby, etc made their great wealth from this trade.

Then, arrived that fearful year of 1692! Salem’s neighbors lost control and thus commenced the worse witch hysteria ever witness in this country. 19 were put to death, countless imprisoned (including a 4-year-old) and two dogs. Persecution and intolerance were the order of the day; if you did not conform you were accused.  The community defaulted its standing as a leading maritime harbor to the city of Boston.

Coming January 2021…

The Salem Historical Society is producing an on-line journal on the history of Salem. It will present a researched chronicle on the history of the town. This is a huge undertaking of the Society and will provide a detailed exposition from the founding to the present day. We are asking for a  donation of: $25  $50  $100  _other and become a chapter in the written history of Salem!

Salem Historical Society: where history comes alive.

The Salem Historical Society is a non-profit 501c3 organization dedicated to bringing the historical community of Salem (MA) to researchers, scholars and the general public.  It provides the city and other historical establishments with a centralized hub of documents, records, and personal accounts related to the history of Salem. The non-profit is made up of volunteers, residents and community leaders.

Finale Note:

Nathaniel Hawthorn needed to remove himself from the Salem community but the city nevertheless deems him their favorite son. Hawthorn’s great uncle had been an influential member of the Court of Oyes and Terminator, the tribunal which oversaw the witchcraft affair. In fact, The Scarlet Letter was poeticized as an apology to the Salem fellowship for John Hathorne’s involvement. Hawthorne, of course became a literary strongman with his authored novels being read widely.